NFL Draft First-Round Riches: Rams, Jets, Vikings Multiple Picks

Cold, Hard Football Facts for May 03, 2013



By Scott Kacsmar
The Cold Hard Football Facts Comeback King (@CaptainComeback)

A NFL team’s draft is often defined by the first-round pick. That’s where the best talent is, but also the greatest risk and cost.

Having multiple picks in the first round is like loading up to play the lottery. You give yourself a better chance of finding a star, but the expectations are going to be even higher. Failing on all the picks would be disastrous for any general manager.

In the 2013 draft, the Rams, Jets and Vikings all used multiple picks in the first round. The Vikings even traded up with New England to snatch a third, which hasn’t been done by any team since the 2001 Rams.

For the Jets, it was a huge draft as the team is moving on from Darrelle Revis and apparently from Mark Sanchez as well.

Picking at No. 9 and No. 13 could become a defining moment for where the team goes from here. They took Alabama’s Dee Milliner, considered the best cornerback in the draft, as well as Missouri’s Sheldon Richardson on the defensive line.

The Rams added a big weapon in West Virginia’s Tavon Austin, hoping to give Sam Bradford a much more talented version of Danny Amendola. They also found boom-or-bust candidate linebacker Alec Ogletree still sitting at No. 30.

The Vikings will put Florida’s Sharrif Floyd, who saw his stock plummet down to No. 23, at defensive tackle next to Kevin Williams. Xavier Rhodes could start at cornerback while Cordarrelle Patterson hopes to learn a thing or two from Greg Jennings.

These are big picks for teams trying to get back on track. Sometimes you can build the foundation for a Super Bowl run, such as the 1995 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Warren Sapp and Derrick Brooks) and 1996 Baltimore Ravens (Jonathan Ogden and Ray Lewis) did with home-run selections.

But those drafts are the gold standard. What does a team usually get when they use multiple first-round picks?

We have the data of course.

 

Summary Results (1967-2012)

We are only concerned with teams that actually used multiple first-round picks in a draft. So if a team started the draft with multiple first-round picks, but made a trade(s) so that they only picked in the round once, they were not considered for this study. Supplemental draft picks were not included.

Data was collected from Pro-Football-Reference, including the Approximate Value (AV) each pick had. The types used were the Weighted Career AV (CarAV), which is for the player’s entire career. Also collected was the Draft AV (DrAV), which is how much weighted AV the player had when he played for his drafting team.

The main interest is seeing what value the drafting team received. If a player disappointed on your team but became a star for someone else (like Garrison Hearst in Arizona vs. San Francisco), then it will not reflect well in your draft success grade.

We did not use arbitrary letter grades either. This is more of a “Hit/Fail” (or pass/fail) grade. Sure, some failures/hits are bigger than others, and some players can be just mediocre, but this was the easiest way to have a reasonable grading system.

After studying 176 teams and 366 players, here are the results, subject to change due to active players:

Multiple 1st-Round Picks (1967-2012)

Total Team Cases (Excluding 2013)

176

Players

366

Pro Bowl Players

130 (35.5%)

1st-Team All-Pro Players

65 (17.8%)

Hall of Fame Players

17 (4.6%)

Average Career AV

41.6

Average Draft AV

32.7

Average Games Played (Career)

105.6

Average Seasons Played (Drafted Team)

5.85

Hits

236 (64.5%)

Failures

130 (35.5%)

Teams Drafting Multiple Pro Bowlers

25 (14.2%)

Of the 366 players, 35.5 percent make a Pro Bowl in their career with half the total earning a prestigious first-team All-Pro selection. So far there are 17 Hall of Fame players. The players play about 106 games in their career, and just under six seasons for the team who drafted them.

Last week we looked at just offensive tackles from the first round during the same time span, and they had slightly better numbers (110.9 games, 6.57 seasons with drafted team, 43.9 Career AV, 36.6 Draft AV).

Only 25 teams were able to draft multiple Pro Bowlers in the first round. They all drafted two, so no one has found three. Also, four more teams (1986 Bills, 1989 Bears, 1992 Dolphins and 2001 Seahawks) drafted one or two players that became a Pro Bowl player on another team.

Eight players never played for the team that drafted them. Their stories will be explained later.

Here are the summaries for how each case panned out, which is probably the best way of looking at it. Teams with two picks were separated from those with three and the one team (2000 Jets) that had four picks.

Case-by-Case Breakdown

TWO PICKS

Cases

163

Pct.

100% Hit (2/2)

65

39.9%

50% Hit (1/2)

76

46.6%

0% Hit (0/2)

22

13.5%

THREE PICKS

Cases

12

Pct.

100% Hit (3/3)

6

50.0%

66.7% Hit (2/3)

3

25.0%

33.3% Hit (1/3)

3

25.0%

0% Hit (0/3)

0

0.0%

2000 Jets - 3/4 (75.0% Hit)

With two picks, you are more likely (60.1 percent) to miss on one player than hit both, but that was probably expected anyway.

Only 22 teams (12.5 percent) botched every pick, so that is a good sign you will be able to find one quality player. Nailing every pick happens roughly 40 percent of the time, though “nailing” is very subjective.

Getting Regan Upshaw and Marcus Jones was technically not bad for Tampa Bay in 1996, but it can’t hold a candle to Sapp and Brooks from the year before.

As we already seen, drafting multiple Pro Bowl players is just a 14 percent likelihood.

The overall player hit rate of 64.5 percent seems a little high, though in some cases, we deemed a player a hit even if he only played three or four solid seasons with the team before moving on. Careers are not long, and finding someone to start for a few years is valuable.

Anyone making a Pro Bowl for his drafting team was considered a hit, even if it was a suspect nod like Kerry Collins in Carolina (1996). Similarly, players deemed to have one high-quality season were likely to be considered a hit as well, even if the overall tenure was not that good.

Obviously the expectations are different for the No. 2 pick versus the No. 12 pick versus the No. 32 pick. Certain positions also carry more expectations, such as quarterback.

As for some context on AV, here is a graph of the weighted career averages for AV based on draft position for the entire draft (picks 1-254):

You expect something in the 50s with a top pick, though by the time you get to the end of the first round, anything around a 30 is average.

It is pretty easy to judge a bust or a great success, but the players that fall in between make it difficult. If you draft a player with the No. 14 pick, he plays six years for your team, but only is a major starter for two or three, is that a hit or not?

Judging the draft is rarely easy.

 

The Year-By-Year Data (1967-2012)

To better understand what type of grades for players we are talking about in terms of hits and failures, we will present every single one with some notes on the more interesting cases.

The stats in each table are the same as explained before in regards to AV. “DrYrs” are how many years the player played for the team that drafted him. The “GP” are how many games the player played in his entire career.

Hall of Fame players are in italics while any class that was a full “hit” (100.0 percent) is highlighted in bold.

 

1967-69 (Pre-Merger)

The first common draft combining both the NFL and AFL took place in 1967. Before the 1970 merger, 13 teams used multiple draft choices in the first round.

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

1967

Colts

1

Bubba Smith

DE

68

52

111

5

1

 

50.0%

20

Jim Detwiler

HB

0

0

0

0

 

1

1967

MIN

2

Clint Jones

RB

24

23

87

6

 

1

66.7%

8

Gene Washington

WR

41

40

95

6

1

 

15

Alan Page (HOF)

DT

164

143

218

12

1

 

1967

SF

3

Steve Spurrier

QB

23

19

106

9

 

1

50.0%

11

Cas Banaszek

OT

54

54

120

10

1

 

1967

HOU

5

George Webster

LB

71

56

119

6

1

 

50.0%

23

Tom Regner

G

17

17

67

6

 

1

1967

GB

9

Bob Hyland

C

27

4

136

4

 

1

0.0%

25

Don Horn

QB

10

9

57

4

 

1

1968

SD

4

Russ Washington

OT

99

99

200

15

1

 

50.0%

18

Jim Hill

DB

35

12

94

3

 

1

1968

GB

5

Fred Carr

LB

69

69

140

10

1

 

100.0%

26

Bill Lueck

G

32

29

101

7

1

 

1968

MIA

8

Larry Csonka (HOF)

RB

73

66

146

8

1

 

100.0%

27

Doug Crusan

OT

34

34

82

7

1

 

1968

DET

11

Greg Landry

QB

79

72

146

11

1

 

100.0%

24

Earl McCullouch

WR

29

29

75

6

1

 

1968

KC

19

Mo Moorman

G

40

40

72

6

1

 

50.0%

22

George Daney

G

12

12

97

7

 

1

1969

SF

7

Ted Kwalick

TE

41

39

108

6

1

 

100.0%

16

Gene A. Washington

WR

71

70

140

9

1

 

1969

RAM

8

Larry Smith

RB

32

29

72

5

 

1

33.3%

10

Jim Seymour

WR

5

0

31

0

 

1

21

Bob Klein

TE

48

33

145

8

1

 

1969

SD

9

Marty Domres

QB

19

5

90

3

 

1

50.0%

18

Bob Babich

LB

41

18

125

3

1

 

Our very first example is a great bit of trivia. After the Colts made defensive end Bubba Smith the No. 1 overall pick in 1967, they selected Michigan halfback Jim Detwiler at No. 20. Knee surgery ended his rookie season, which would end his career as he did not make the team the following year.

This makes Detwiler the only player drafted in the first round of the common draft to never play a single regular season game in the NFL.

Minnesota was the first team in this era to have three first-round picks. They did not do too well with RB Clint Jones at No. 2, but Gene Washington was a Pro Bowl receiver and Alan Page was obviously a Hall of Famer on Bud Grant’s defense.

The Packers may have won Super Bowl I, but their double dip of Bob Hyland and Don Horn was nowhere close to being the next Jim Ringo and Bart Starr. They did a bit better the following year with Fred Carr and Bill Lueck.

The 1969 Rams nearly blew their three first-round picks, all on skill players, but at least tight end Bob Klein started 81 games for them.

 

1970-74

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

1970

CLE

3

Mike Phipps

QB

40

32

119

7

 

1

50.0%

21

Bob McKay

OT

32

20

105

6

1

 

1970

GB

2

Mike McCoy

DT

55

49

132

7

1

 

100.0%

16

Rich McGeorge

TE

36

36

116

9

1

 

1970

SF

9

Cedrick Hardman

DE

60

58

171

10

1

 

100.0%

17

Bruce Taylor

DB

49

49

109

8

1

 

1971

CLT

22

Don McCauley

RB

45

45

156

11

1

 

50.0%

26

Lenny Dunlap

DB

15

1

46

1

 

1

1971

RAM

10

Isiah Robertson

LB

115

90

168

8

1

 

100.0%

20

Jack Youngblood (HOF)

DE

121

121

202

14

1

 

1972

CHI

3

Lionel Antoine

OT

14

14

68

6

 

1

0.0%

12

Craig Clemons

DB

28

28

82

6

 

1

1972

GB

7

Willie Buchanon

DB

66

50

137

7

1

 

50.0%

11

Jerry Tagge

QB

8

8

18

3

 

1

1972

NYG

17

Eldridge Small

DB

6

6

34

3

 

1

0.0%

24

Larry Jacobson

DT

9

9

33

3

 

1

1972

NYJ

9

Jerome Barkum

TE

63

63

158

12

1

 

50.0%

20

Michael Taylor

LB

3

3

22

2

 

1

1973

CLT

2

Bert Jones

QB

81

79

102

9

1

 

100.0%

10

Joe Ehrmann

DT

35

32

121

8

1

 

1973

BUF

7

Paul Seymour

TE

20

20

69

5

 

1

50.0%

26

Joe DeLamielleure (HOF)

G

81

54

185

8

1

 

1973

CLE

16

Steve Holden

WR

10

10

54

4

 

1

0.0%

22

Pete Adams

G

12

12

25

2

 

1

1973

HOU

1

John Matuszak

DE

48

4

123

1

 

1

0.0%

14

George Amundson

RB

4

4

29

2

 

1

1973

NE

4

John Hannah (HOF)

G

102

102

183

13

1

 

100.0%

11

Sam Cunningham

RB

60

60

107

9

1

 

19

Darryl Stingley

WR

27

27

60

5

1

 

1973

PHI

3

Jerry Sisemore

OT

68

68

156

12

1

 

100.0%

6

Charle Young

TE

62

34

187

4

1

 

1974

CLT

5

John Dutton

DT

75

40

185

5

1

 

100.0%

24

Roger Carr

WR

50

48

115

8

1

 

1974

CHI

4

Waymond Bryant

LB

28

28

53

4

 

1

0.0%

20

Dave Gallagher

DE

26

7

51

1

 

1

1974

DAL

1

Too Tall Jones

DE

97

97

224

15

1

 

50.0%

22

Charley Young

RB

10

10

37

3

 

1

1974

MIN

17

Fred McNeill

LB

57

57

167

12

1

 

100.0%

25

Steve Riley

OT

52

52

138

11

1

 

1974

SD

2

Bo Matthews

RB

13

12

101

6

 

1

50.0%

15

Don Goode

LB

38

31

112

6

1

 

1974

SF

9

Wilbur Jackson

RB

39

33

94

5

1

 

50.0%

10

Bill Sandifer

DT

14

11

46

3

 

1

The early candidate for best class: 1971 Rams getting Isiah Robertson (No. 10) and Jack Youngblood (No.20) to be stalwarts on the defense.

For the 1973 Oilers, John Matuszak was the No. 1 pick, but since he tried to join the World Football League in addition to the NFL, they traded him to Kansas City after just one season with the team.

The 1973 Patriots had the first successful first-round trio of picks. John Hannah (No. 4) is considered the best guard in NFL history. Sam Cunningham (No. 11) was a very productive fullback with 7,358 yards from scrimmage and 49 touchdowns. Darryl Stingley (No. 19) was just coming off his best season as a wide receiver before that tragic hit by Oakland’s Jack Tatum ended his career in a 1978 preseason game.

 

1975-79

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

1975

DAL

2

Randy White (HOF)

DT

119

119

209

14

1

 

100.0%

18

Thomas Henderson

LB

31

29

75

5

1

 

1975

HOU

6

Robert Brazile

LB

84

84

147

10

1

 

50.0%

15

Don Hardeman

RB

12

9

64

3

 

1

1975

NO

7

Larry Burton

WR

7

5

43

3

 

1

0.0%

12

Kurt Schumacher

G

7

6

45

3

 

1

1975

RAM

9

Mike Fanning

DT

31

27

137

8

1

 

100.0%

11

Dennis Harrah

G

54

54

168

13

1

 

20

Doug France

OT

50

45

110

7

1

 

1975

SD

8

Gary Johnson

DT

68

64

157

10

1

 

100.0%

22

Mike H. Williams

DB

42

42

109

8

1

 

1976

CIN

11

Billy Brooks

WR

17

17

55

4

 

1

50.0%

24

Archie Griffin

RB

37

37

98

7

1

 

1976

DET

10

James Hunter

DB

44

44

86

7

1

 

50.0%

16

Lawrence Gaines

RB

9

9

43

3

 

1

1976

MIA

17

Larry Gordon

LB

52

52

100

7

1

 

100.0%

19

Kim Bokamper

DE

53

53

127

9

1

 

1976

NE

5

Mike Haynes (HOF)

DB

108

65

177

7

1

 

100.0%

12

Pete Brock

C

35

35

154

12

1

 

21

Tim Fox

DB

50

37

141

6

1

 

1977

ATL

6

Warren Bryant

OT

38

38

104

8

1

 

50.0%

20

Wilson Faumuina

DT

17

17

74

5

 

1

1977

CIN

3

Eddie Edwards

DE

61

61

170

12

1

 

66.7%

8

Wilson Whitley

DT

38

38

82

6

1

 

22

Mike Cobb

TE

6

1

62

1

 

1

1977

GB

9

Mike Butler

DE

40

40

95

7

1

 

100.0%

28

Ezra Johnson

DE

48

45

192

11

1

 

1977

NE

16

Raymond Clayborn

DB

75

74

208

13

1

 

100.0%

25

Stanley Morgan

WR

82

81

196

13

1

 

1978

CIN

8

Ross Browner

DE

50

49

138

9

1

 

100.0%

16

Blair Bush

C

55

23

246

5

1

 

1978

CLE

12

Clay Matthews

LB

96

91

278

16

1

 

100.0%

23

Ozzie Newsome (HOF)

TE

79

79

198

13

1

 

1978

GB

6

James Lofton (HOF)

WR

102

71

233

9

1

 

100.0%

26

John Anderson

LB

64

64

146

12

1

 

1978

SF

7

Ken MacAfee

TE

8

8

29

2

 

1

50.0%

24

Dan Bunz

LB

31

31

88

7

1

 

1978

CRD

15

Steve Little

K

0

0

33

3

 

1

50.0%

19

Ken Greene

DB

31

25

98

5

1

 

1979

BUF

1

Tom Cousineau

LB

37

0

66

0

 

1

50.0%

5

Jerry Butler

WR

35

35

88

7

1

 

1979

CHI

4

Dan Hampton (HOF)

DE

103

103

157

12

1

 

100.0%

9

Al Harris

DE

47

37

149

9

1

 

1979

CIN

3

Jack Thompson

QB

13

5

51

4

 

1

0.0%

12

Charles Alexander

RB

27

27

102

7

 

1

1979

KC

2

Mike Bell

DE

45

45

135

12

1

 

50.0%

23

Steve Fuller

QB

29

21

90

4

 

1

1979

RAM

19

George Andrews

LB

30

30

80

6

1

 

100.0%

26

Kent Hill

G

57

44

132

8

1

 

New England did it again with an impressive three-man haul in 1976. Mike Haynes was a Hall of Fame cornerback. Pete Brock was a long-time center with the team. Tim Fox made 91 starts and one Pro Bowl at safety for the Patriots.

The following year the Patriots snatched Raymond Clayborn and Stanley Morgan. Both played 13 seasons with the Patriots. The only other team to do that in this entire study was Cleveland in 1978 with Clay Matthews (16 seasons) and Ozzie Newsome (13 seasons).

But not everything was positive from this era.

Buffalo drafted linebacker Tom Cousineau first overall in 1979, but the CFL offered him twice as much money, leading Cousineau to Canada. When he tried to return to the NFL, Buffalo was able to trade him to Cleveland for the No. 14 pick in the 1983 draft.

That pick turned out to be Jim Kelly, who also wanted no part of Buffalo. He too left for another league (USFL), but returned to the Bills in 1986. You can say it worked out.

In some ways, you could argue the St. Louis Cardinals made the worst first-round pick since 1967 when they took kicker Steve Little 15th overall in 1978.

Little was a star kicker at Arkansas, tying the NCAA record with a 67-yard field goal in 1977 (still stands today). He did double as punter in the NFL, but averaged a rather weak 38.5 yards per punt.

Little was just 13-of-27 (48.1 percent) on field goals in the 33 games he played. After the Cardinals released him his story took another tragic turn. It was only hours after his release that Little was involved in a car accident, which left him a quadriplegic. He died at the age of 43.

 

1980-84

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

1980

CLT

5

Curtis Dickey

RB

38

33

85

6

1

 

50.0%

24

Derrick Hatchett

DB

19

16

49

4

 

1

1980

GB

4

Bruce Clark

DE

46

0

113

0

 

1

0.0%

26

George Cumby

LB

33

29

92

6

 

1

1980

NE

14

Roland James

DB

50

50

145

11

1

 

50.0%

25

Vagas Ferguson

RB

10

10

33

3

 

1

1980

SF

13

Earl Cooper

RB

25

25

93

6

 

1

50.0%

20

Jim Stuckey

DE

25

24

93

7

1

 

1981

CLT

12

Randy McMillan

RB

32

32

88

6

1

 

100.0%

18

Donnell Thompson

DE

50

50

147

11

1

 

1981

RAI

21

Ted Watts

DB

17

14

74

4

 

1

0.0%

23

Curt Marsh

G

14

14

45

5

 

1

1982

CLT

2

Johnie Cooks

LB

41

29

128

7

1

 

50.0%

4

Art Schlichter

QB

4

4

13

3

 

1

1982

NE

1

Kenneth Sims

DE

32

32

74

8

1

 

50.0%

27

Lester Williams

NT

13

13

46

4

 

1

1983

BUF

12

Tony Hunter

TE

14

6

47

2

 

1

50.0%

14

Jim Kelly (HOF)

QB

102

102

160

11

1

 

1983

CHI

6

Jimbo Covert

OT

59

59

111

8

1

 

100.0%

18

Willie Gault

WR

55

31

170

5

1

 

1983

SD

5

Billy Ray Smith

LB

46

46

126

10

1

 

100.0%

20

Gary W. Anderson

RB

43

30

111

4

1

 

22

Gill Byrd

DB

62

62

149

10

1

 

1984

CIN

7

Ricky Hunley

LB

18

0

91

0

 

1

33.3%

16

Pete Koch

NT

12

1

58

1

 

1

28

Brian Blados

OT

34

32

107

8

1

 

1984

IND

8

Leonard Coleman

DB

9

7

49

3

 

1

50.0%

19

Ron Solt

G

37

22

116

5

1

 

1984

KC

5

Bill Maas

NT

55

54

130

9

1

 

100.0%

21

John Alt

OT

68

68

179

13

1

 

1984

NYG

3

Carl Banks

LB

66

50

173

9

1

 

100.0%

27

William Roberts

G

52

44

195

10

1

 

1984

NYJ

10

Russell Carter

DB

18

12

64

4

 

1

0.0%

15

Ron Faurot

DE

6

6

20

2

 

1

This is all about the Colts. They found a way to double up picks in 1980, 1981, 1982 and 1984. In between they had a debacle when they drafted John Elway.

But did those other eight picks do them any justice as the team moved to Indianapolis in 1984? Not really. They may have “hit” on five of the eight picks, but they were mostly marginal successes.

The Colts found no stars, while completely botching the 1982 draft. One could argue Johnie Cooks, the No. 2 pick, was a disappointment, but at least he started 74 games for the team.

Taking Ohio State quarterback Art Schlichter at No. 4 proved to be the mistake. In trying to replace Bert Jones, the Colts thought they had a franchise quarterback, but Schlichter’s gambling and poor performance when he did play makes him an all-time bust.

It looks worse when Chip Banks, a four-time Pro Bowl linebacker, went No. 4 to Cleveland and Jim McMahon went No. 5 to Chicago. In hindsight, the Colts could only wish they took Banks and McMahon instead of Cooks and Schlichter.

The Colts were not the only team with a player refusing to play for them.

In 1980, Green Bay drafted defensive end Bruce Clark with the No. 4 pick, but he refused to play for them since he didn’t want to be a 3-4 nose tackle. So like Cousineau, Clark went north to the CFL. Clark made his NFL debut in 1982 for the Saints, having a decent career with one Pro Bowl. He stayed at defensive end.

The Bengals nearly blew their 1984 first round. Ricky Hunley was taken No. 7, but he could not reach a contract agreement and was traded to Denver where he was nothing special. Pete Koch lasted just one year with the team, while offensive lineman Brian Blados was just a moderate success as the last pick of the first round.

 

1985-89

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

1985

BUF

1

Bruce Smith (HOF)

DE

143

134

279

15

1

 

50.0%

14

Derrick Burroughs

DB

18

18

58

5

 

1

1985

CIN

13

Eddie Brown

WR

58

58

102

7

1

 

100.0%

25

Emanuel King

LB

15

13

67

4

1

 

1985

HOU

3

Ray Childress

DT

90

90

163

11

1

 

50.0%

11

Richard J. Johnson

DB

19

19

98

8

 

1

1986

ATL

2

Tony Casillas

DT

57

25

167

5

1

 

100.0%

17

Tim Green

LB

29

29

99

8

1

 

1986

BUF

16

Ronnie Harmon

RB

63

12

181

4

 

1

50.0%

20

Will Wolford

OT

73

43

191

7

1

 

1986

CIN

11

Joe Kelly

LB

43

18

156

4

1

 

100.0%

21

Tim McGee

WR

45

42

134

8

1

 

1986

SD

8

Leslie O'Neal

DE

86

69

196

9

1

 

50.0%

13

James FitzPatrick

OT

9

6

65

4

 

1

1986

TB

1

Bo Jackson

RB

22

0

38

0

 

1

0.0%

25

Rod Jones

DB

33

11

146

4

 

1

1987

HOU

3

Alonzo Highsmith

RB

12

12

65

3

 

1

50.0%

20

Haywood Jeffires

WR

52

50

132

9

1

 

1987

SF

22

Harris Barton

OT

80

80

138

10

1

 

50.0%

25

Terrence Flagler

RB

6

3

41

3

 

1

1988

CHI

23

Brad Muster

RB

31

29

95

5

1

 

100.0%

27

Wendell Davis

WR

27

27

81

6

1

 

1988

RAI

6

Tim Brown

WR

104

104

255

16

1

 

100.0%

9

Terry McDaniel

DB

69

69

152

10

1

 

25

Scott Davis

DT

23

23

75

5

1

 

1988

RAM

14

Gaston Green

RB

16

4

58

3

 

1

0.0%

20

Aaron Cox

WR

15

15

82

5

 

1

1989

ATL

5

Deion Sanders (HOF)

CB

115

33

188

5

1

 

50.0%

27

Shawn Collins

WR

11

11

49

3

 

1

1989

CHI

11

Donnell Woolford

DB

48

45

126

8

1

 

100.0%

12

Trace Armstrong

DE

62

36

211

6

1

 

1989

MIA

9

Sammie Smith

RB

13

12

44

3

 

1

50.0%

25

Louis Oliver

DB

43

39

117

7

1

 

1989

CRD

10

Eric Hill

LB

52

45

160

9

1

 

50.0%

17

Joe Wolf

OT

23

23

94

9

 

1

1989

PIT

7

Tim Worley

RB

16

10

48

4

 

1

0.0%

24

Tom Ricketts

G

8

7

53

3

 

1

1989

RAM

21

Bill Hawkins

DE

6

6

42

4

 

1

50.0%

26

Cleveland Gary

RB

24

24

68

5

1

 

If you don’t know the story by now, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers made Bo Jackson the No. 1 overall pick in the 1986 draft. But since he was given an ultimatum to choose football or baseball, he refused to sign with the team and went to the Kansas City Royals. Tampa Bay lost their rights to Jackson, allowing Jackson to re-enter the 1987 draft. With teams scared to waste another pick on the star athlete, the Raiders took a chance with the 183rd pick in the seventh round. Jackson went on to show his freakish ability for four seasons before suffering a career-ending injury.

A year after getting Jackson the Raiders did a bang-up job in the first round of the 1988 draft. Tim Brown (No. 6) became the franchise’s leading receiver with 16 years of service. Terry McDaniel (No. 9) made five straight Pro Bowls as a cornerback. Even Scott Davis (No. 25) was a full-time starter on the defensive line for three straight seasons.

 

1990-94

Note that any player on the Browns in 1995 that stayed with the team for the move to Baltimore has their Ravens seasons included in their totals.

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

1990

NE

8

Chris Singleton

LB

29

10

91

4

 

1

0.0%

10

Ray Agnew

DT

41

13

157

5

 

1

1990

GB

18

Tony Bennett

DE

42

20

108

4

1

 

50.0%

19

Darrell Thompson

RB

16

16

60

5

 

1

1991

DAL

1

Russell Maryland

DT

59

30

154

5

1

 

66.7%

12

Alvin Harper

WR

36

29

102

5

1

 

20

Kelvin Pritchett

DT

34

0

208

0

 

1

1991

ATL

3

Bruce Pickens

DB

5

3

48

3

 

1

50.0%

13

Mike Pritchard

WR

42

20

127

3

1

 

1991

NE

11

Pat Harlow

OT

34

22

105

5

 

1

0.0%

14

Leonard Russell

RB

26

14

85

3

 

1

1992

ATL

8

Bob Whitfield

OT

70

67

220

12

1

 

50.0%

19

Tony Smith

RB

4

4

33

3

 

1

1992

CIN

6

David Klingler

QB

10

10

33

4

 

1

50.0%

28

Darryl Williams

DB

54

27

156

6

1

 

1992

DAL

17

Kevin R. Smith

DB

35

35

103

8

1

 

100.0%

24

Robert Jones

LB

54

20

151

4

1

 

1992

IND

1

Steve Emtman

DE

13

8

50

3

 

1

0.0%

2

Quentin Coryatt

LB

31

30

82

6

 

1

1992

MIA

7

Troy Vincent

DB

88

13

207

4

1

 

100.0%

12

Marco Coleman

DE

72

22

207

4

1

 

1993

GB

15

Wayne Simmons

LB

45

24

90

5

1

 

100.0%

29

George Teague

DB

38

18

133

3

1

 

1993

NO

8

Willie Roaf (HOF)

OT

101

56

189

9

1

 

50.0%

20

Irv Smith

TE

23

16

95

5

 

1

1993

PHI

19

Lester Holmes

G

31

13

102

4

 

1

0.0%

24

Leonard Renfro

DT

3

3

23

2

 

1

1993

CRD

3

Garrison Hearst

RB

71

7

126

3

 

1

0.0%

18

Ernest Dye

OT

10

10

50

4

 

1

1993

SF

26

Dana Stubblefield

DT

69

54

154

7

1

 

50.0%

27

Todd Kelly

LB

5

4

46

2

 

1

1994

CLE

9

Antonio Langham

DB

29

13

102

5

 

1

50.0%

29

Derrick Alexander

WR

56

8

126

4

1

 

1994

IND

2

Marshall Faulk (HOF)

RB

133

51

176

5

1

 

50.0%

5

Trev Alberts

LB

4

4

29

3

 

1

1994

MIN

18

Dewayne Washington

DB

66

21

191

4

1

 

100.0%

19

Todd Steussie

OT

75

55

212

7

1

 

1994

SF

7

Bryant Young

DT

90

90

208

14

1

 

50.0%

28

William Floyd

FB

34

25

90

4

 

1

Here we go again with the Colts making bad picks, though the first rounds in 1991 and 1992 were not that deep at all. That’s how Russell Maryland, the No. 1 pick by Dallas in 1991, still looks like a decent pick even if he was nothing special. Dallas traded Kelvin Pritchett to Detroit, so he never even played for the Cowboys.

But the Colts held the first two picks in 1992. They went defense with Steve Emtman and Quentin Coryatt. Emtman could never stay healthy while Coryatt had a strange career path, flaming out quickly after earning a big contract. Neither player came close to earning their draft status, though when you look back on the round, the Colts did not have many good options.

Two years later the Colts were again picking twice in the top five. This time Marshall Faulk was a strong pick, but linebacker Trev Alberts (No. 5) was a big disappointment with just seven starts.

 

1995-99

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

1995

CAR

5

Kerry Collins

QB

85

13

197

4

1

 

100.0%

22

Tyrone Poole

DB

43

21

144

3

1

 

29

Blake Brockermeyer

OT

38

19

136

4

1

 

1995

JAX

2

Tony Boselli

OT

63

63

91

7

1

 

100.0%

19

James Stewart

RB

45

23

101

5

1

 

1995

MIN

11

Derrick L. Alexander

DE

26

22

73

4

 

1

50.0%

24

Korey Stringer

OT

44

44

93

6

1

 

1995

NYJ

9

Kyle Brady

TE

45

11

197

4

 

1

50.0%

16

Hugh Douglas

DE

70

12

138

3

1

 

1995

TB

12

Warren Sapp (HOF)

DT

117

104

198

9

1

 

100.0%

28

Derrick Brooks

LB

141

141

224

14

1

 

1996

BAL

4

Jonathan Ogden (HOF)

OT

89

89

177

12

1

 

100.0%

26

Ray Lewis

LB

159

159

228

17

1

 

1996

DET

17

Reggie D. Brown

LB

11

11

26

2

 

1

50.0%

23

Jeff Hartings

C

57

18

163

5

1

 

1996

RAM

6

Lawrence Phillips

RB

15

9

35

2

 

1

50.0%

18

Eddie Kennison

WR

73

12

179

3

1

 

1996

TB

12

Regan Upshaw

DE

38

23

110

4

1

 

100.0%

22

Marcus Jones

DE

22

22

85

6

1

 

1997

SEA

3

Shawn Springs

DB

62

33

169

7

1

 

100.0%

6

Walter Jones

OT

94

94

180

12

1

 

1997

TB

12

Warrick Dunn

RB

95

52

181

5

1

 

50.0%

16

Reidel Anthony

WR

21

21

73

5

 

1

1998

CIN

13

Takeo Spikes

LB

83

24

219

5

1

 

100.0%

17

Brian Simmons

LB

44

43

137

9

1

 

1998

JAX

9

Fred Taylor

RB

88

86

153

11

1

 

100.0%

25

Donovin Darius

DB

46

45

118

9

1

 

1998

NE

18

Robert Edwards

RB

13

11

28

1

1

 

100.0%

22

Tebucky Jones

DB

27

14

109

5

1

 

1998

RAI

4

Charles Woodson

DB

101

46

206

8

1

 

100.0%

23

Mo Collins

G

23

23

71

6

1

 

1999

CRD

8

David Boston

WR

37

28

75

4

1

 

100.0%

21

L.J. Shelton

OT

41

23

146

6

1

 

1999

DET

9

Chris Claiborne

LB

36

26

105

4

1

 

50.0%

27

Aaron Gibson

OT

14

5

38

2

 

1

1999

MIN

11

Daunte Culpepper

QB

86

81

105

7

1

 

50.0%

29

Dimitrius Underwood

DT

1

0

19

0

 

1

1999

NE

17

Damien Woody

C

50

26

173

5

1

 

50.0%

28

Andy Katzenmoyer

LB

9

9

24

2

 

1

This was the beginning for franchises like Carolina, Jacksonville and Baltimore. Some cashed in greatly.

Carolina’s three picks in 1995 were marginal hits, but it did help the team to the NFC Championship in their second season in 1996. Kerry Collins did not prove to be a franchise quarterback for the Panthers, even though he did make the Pro Bowl that year.

The big winner was Tampa Bay, making multiple first-round picks in three consecutive years (1995-97). But they never nailed it better than in 1995 with Warren Sapp (No. 12) and Derrick Brooks (No. 28). They would eventually lead a dominant defense all the way to a Super Bowl in 2002.

The next year the Baltimore Ravens wisely made their first two draft choices the best players in team history: Jonathan Ogden (No. 4) and Ray Lewis (No. 26). Ogden goes into the Hall of Fame where Lewis will join him in five years. Lewis gave 17 years to the Ravens, which is longer than anyone in this 366-player study gave to the team that drafted them.

Seattle also had a very strong class in 1997 with Shawn Springs (No. 3) and Walter Jones (No. 6).

New England’s Robert Edwards had a very promising rookie season (1,115 rushing yards and 12 touchdowns), but a knee injury suffered at a flag football game for a NFL event in Hawaii ruined his career. He tried to make a comeback in 2002 with Miami, but he was never the same.

Dimitrius Underwood is one of the great bust stories, taken by the Vikings at No. 29 in 1999. His Wikipedia page is a must-read with tales of his Christian faith, unpaid child support, a suicide attempt and taking notes on the apocalypse instead of football.

 

2000-04

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

2000

BAL

5

Jamal Lewis

RB

70

52

131

6

1

 

50.0%

10

Travis Taylor

WR

32

24

101

5

 

1

2000

NYJ

12

Shaun Ellis

DE

71

69

184

11

1

 

75.0%

13

John Abraham

DE

88

38

175

6

1

 

18

Chad Pennington

QB

55

41

89

8

1

 

27

Anthony Becht

TE

25

18

167

5

 

1

2000

SEA

19

Shaun Alexander

RB

68

68

123

8

1

 

50.0%

22

Chris McIntosh

OT

7

7

24

2

 

1

2000

SF

16

Julian Peterson

LB

68

35

158

6

1

 

100.0%

24

Ahmed Plummer

DB

24

24

70

6

1

 

2000

WAS

2

LaVar Arrington

LB

46

45

84

6

1

 

100.0%

3

Chris Samuels

OT

57

57

141

10

1

 

2001

SEA

9

Koren Robinson

WR

35

30

96

4

1

 

100.0%

17

Steve Hutchinson

G

80

35

169

5

1

 

2001

RAM

12

Damione Lewis

DT

32

13

141

5

 

1

33.3%

20

Adam Archuleta

DB

32

26

103

5

 

1

29

Ryan Pickett

DT

54

20

178

5

1

 

2002

NO

13

Donte Stallworth

WR

39

22

115

4

 

1

50.0%

25

Charles Grant

DE

47

47

118

8

1

 

2002

RAI

17

Phillip Buchanon

DB

37

14

122

3

 

1

0.0%

23

Napoleon Harris

LB

33

14

100

3

 

1

2003

CRD

17

Bryant Johnson

WR

26

18

139

5

 

1

50.0%

18

Calvin Pace

DE

53

15

139

5

1

 

2003

BAL

10

Terrell Suggs

LB

84

84

149

10

1

 

50.0%

19

Kyle Boller

QB

18

18

67

5

 

1

2003

CHI

14

Michael Haynes

DE

8

8

42

3

 

1

50.0%

22

Rex Grossman

QB

23

16

54

6

1

 

2003

RAI

31

Nnamdi Asomugha

DB

65

55

154

8

1

 

100.0%

32

Tyler Brayton

DE

39

17

141

5

1

 

2004

ATL

8

DeAngelo Hall

DB

65

29

133

4

1

 

100.0%

29

Michael Jenkins

WR

39

32

130

7

1

 

2004

BUF

13

Lee Evans

WR

49

48

118

7

1

 

50.0%

22

J.P. Losman

QB

19

19

45

5

 

1

2004

DET

7

Roy E. Williams

WR

46

30

115

5

1

 

100.0%

30

Kevin Jones

RB

27

26

64

4

1

 

2004

HOU

10

Dunta Robinson

DB

42

24

131

6

1

 

50.0%

27

Jason Babin

LB

42

10

103

3

 

1

2004

NE

21

Vince Wilfork

NT

74

74

138

9

1

 

100.0%

32

Ben Watson

TE

41

28

116

6

1

 

The 2000 Jets set a record with four first-round picks. Now you might think a team could really build a contender with that value, but it has to be a good draft to do so. The 2000 draft was not very strong in the first round, but did have good depth.

For the most part, the Jets nearly pulled it off the best they could. Shaun Ellis (No. 12) and John Abraham (No. 13) became very good defensive linemen. Chad Pennington (No. 18) was the first quarterback taken, and when healthy was a decent quarterback. No one knew Tom Brady (No. 199) would turn into what he became.

The only real mistake was taking tight end Anthony Becht (No. 27). He was a mediocre receiving threat (8.8 yards per reception for the Jets). Someone like linebacker Keith Bulluck (No. 30) would have topped off the defensive overhaul.

A year later the 2001 Rams had three picks, which would be the last time we saw that until the 2013 Vikings. After a pathetic season on defense, the Rams nearly struck out with three defensive picks. Damione Lewis and Adam Archuleta were low-impact players, while Ryan Pickett (No. 29) did what he could to salvage the class.

The grades on Koren Robinson and Donte Stallworth could easily be switched. Robinson had off-field issues and suspect hands in Seattle, but at least he did have a season with 1,240 receiving yards. Stallworth could not out-produce Joe Horn in New Orleans, never gaining more than 945 yards anywhere he played.

Rex Grossman is the worst quarterback in recent time to start a Super Bowl, but since the 2006 Bears did manage to make it that far with him in every game, it only seemed fair to give them a “hit” for that one.

The 2004 Patriots (Vince Wilfork and Ben Watson) are the last team with multiple first-round picks to win the Super Bowl that season. Watson spent most of that year on injured reserve.

 

2005-09

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

2005

DAL

11

DeMarcus Ware

LB

84

84

128

8

1

 

100.0%

20

Marcus R. Spears

DE

34

34

119

8

1

 

2005

MIN

7

Troy Williamson

WR

8

8

49

3

 

1

0.0%

18

Erasmus James

DE

6

6

28

3

 

1

2005

SD

12

Shawne Merriman

LB

40

37

75

6

1

 

100.0%

28

Luis Castillo

DE

34

34

82

7

1

 

2005

WAS

9

Carlos Rogers

DB

44

26

110

6

1

 

50.0%

25

Jason Campbell

QB

44

32

77

4

 

1

2006

BUF

8

Donte Whitner

DB

35

21

100

5

1

 

50.0%

26

John McCargo

DT

3

3

44

5

 

1

2006

NYJ

4

D'Brickashaw Ferguson

OT

47

47

112

7

1

 

100.0%

29

Nick Mangold

C

49

49

110

7

1

 

2006

SF

6

Vernon Davis

TE

45

45

104

7

1

 

100.0%

22

Manny Lawson

DE

37

26

96

5

1

 

2007

CLE

3

Joe Thomas

OT

50

50

96

6

1

 

50.0%

22

Brady Quinn

QB

3

3

24

3

 

1

2007

SF

11

Patrick Willis

LB

82

82

92

6

1

 

100.0%

28

Joe Staley

OT

39

39

82

6

1

 

2008

ATL

3

Matt Ryan

QB

67

67

78

5

1

 

100.0%

21

Sam Baker

OT

27

27

65

5

1

 

2008

CAR

13

Jonathan Stewart

RB

30

30

71

5

1

 

50.0%

19

Jeff Otah

OT

13

13

29

3

 

1

2008

DAL

22

Felix Jones

RB

26

26

64

5

 

1

50.0%

25

Mike Jenkins

DB

23

23

71

5

1

 

2008

KC

5

Glenn Dorsey

DT

28

28

66

5

 

1

50.0%

15

Branden Albert

OT

22

22

73

5

1

 

2008

NYJ

6

Vernon Gholston

DE

6

6

45

3

 

1

50.0%

30

Dustin Keller

TE

28

28

72

5

1

 

2009

BUF

11

Aaron Maybin

DE

6

3

47

2

 

1

50.0%

28

Eric Wood

C

17

17

47

4

1

 

2009

DEN

12

Knowshon Moreno

RB

20

20

44

4

 

1

0.0%

18

Robert Ayers

DE

13

13

57

4

 

1

2009

DET

1

Matthew Stafford

QB

33

33

45

4

1

 

100.0%

20

Brandon Pettigrew

TE

25

25

57

4

1

 

2009

GB

9

B.J. Raji

DT

23

23

60

4

1

 

100.0%

26

Clay Matthews

LB

46

46

58

4

1

 

The 2005 Vikings really stunk it up with Troy Williamson and Erasmus James, even if injuries did sack the latter. The only other team here with two failures would be 2009 Denver, and that one could be pending if they decide to give Knowshon Moreno and/or Robert Ayers another shot at significant playing time.

Carlos Rogers and Donte Whitner both improved after going to San Francisco, who loaded up on some nice picks themselves with Patrick Willis, Vernon Davis and Joe Staley.

 

2010-13

With these picks, the grades are mostly incomplete, so take them with a grain of salt. Included are the 2013 rookies from the three teams with multiple picks.

Year

Team

Pick

Players

Pos.

CarAV

DrAV

GP

DrYrs

HIT

FAIL

HIT%

2010

DEN

22

Demaryius Thomas

WR

19

19

37

3

1

 

50.0%

25

Tim Tebow

QB

12

11

35

3

 

1

2010

DET

2

Ndamukong Suh

DT

32

32

46

3

1

 

50.0%

30

Jahvid Best

RB

13

13

22

3

 

1

2010

SEA

6

Russell Okung

OT

16

16

37

3

1

 

100.0%

14

Earl Thomas

DB

32

32

48

3

1

 

2010

SF

11

Anthony Davis

OT

19

19

48

3

1

 

100.0%

17

Mike Iupati

G

23

23

48

3

1

 

2011

NO

24

Cameron Jordan

DE

14

14

32

2

1

 

100.0%

28

Mark Ingram

RB

8

8

26

2

1

 

2012

CIN

17

Dre Kirkpatrick

CB

0

0

5

1

 

1

50.0%

27

Kevin Zeitler

G

7

7

16

1

1

 

2012

CLE

3

Trent Richardson

RB

6

6

15

1

1

 

50.0%

22

Brandon Weeden

QB

8

8

15

1

 

1

2012

MIN

4

Matt Kalil

OT

7

7

16

1

1

 

100.0%

29

Harrison Smith

FS

7

7

16

1

1

 

2012

NE

21

Chandler Jones

DE

6

6

14

1

1

 

100.0%

25

Dont'a Hightower

ILB

7

7

14

1

1

 

2012

TB

7

Mark Barron

SS

6

6

16

1

1

 

100.0%

31

Doug Martin

RB

14

14

16

1

1

 

2013

RAM

8

Tavon Austin

WR

To Be Determined

30

Alec Ogletree

ILB

2013

NYJ

9

Dee Milliner

CB

13

Sheldon Richardson

DT

2013

MIN

23

Sharrif Floyd

DT

25

Xavier Rhodes

CB

29

Cordarrelle Patterson

WR

Tim Tebow? Do we really have to talk about Him? He did win a playoff game and was still bad enough to allow Denver to get Peyton Manning, so he sure changed NFL history. That’s one indisputable fact.

Jahvid Best suffered a nasty concussion in college and has not stayed healthy in the NFL as well.

Brandon Weeden, born 49 days before Aaron Rodgers in 1983 if you could believe it, has a lot of work to do in Cleveland.

So there you have it. A total of 176 cases of multiple first-round draft picks since 1967 (179 including 2013). Expectations are high for the Rams, Jets and Vikings, but finding multiple studs is obviously not the likely outcome.                                                           

Minnesota is the most interesting team due to three picks all coming in the 20s. Sharrif Floyd was a top-three pick for many, so it either could be a steal or a bust there. Xavier Rhodes was considered one of the top cornerbacks, while Cordarrelle Patterson was an interesting wide receiver project.

Statistically, the odds say one will bust, and you know which one we would pick. It’s the Shiny Hood Ornament with the quarterback who doesn’t like to push it above 100.

 

Scott Kacsmar is a football writer/researcher who has contributed large quantities of data to Pro-Football-Reference.com, including the only standardized database of fourth quarter comebacks and game-winning drives. You can visit his blog for a complete writing archive. Please send any questions or comments to Scott at smk_42@yahoo.com, or you can follow him on Twitter at @CaptainComeback.


Read more: 2013 NFL draft, 2013 NFL draft grades, A Smith, aaron maybin, Aaron Rodgers, Al Harris, Alec Ogletree, Alonzo Highsmith, Anthony Becht, Anthony Davis, B.J. Raji, Baltimore Ravens, ben watson, Brady Quinn, Branden Albert, brandon pettigrew, Brandon Weeden, Brian Simmons, Brown, Bruce Smith, Bruce Taylor, Bryant, Bryant Johnson, Butler, Calvin Pace, Cameron Jordan, Campbell, Carlos Rogers, Chad Pennington, chandler jones, Charles Alexander, Charles Woodson, Clay Matthews, Cordarrelle Patterson, D'Brickashaw Ferguson, Damione Lewis, Danny Amendola, darrelle revis, Darryl Williams, DeAngelo Hall, Dee Milliner, DeMarcus Ware, Demaryius Thomas, Derrick Alexander, Dont'a Hightower, Donte Stallworth, Donte Whitner, Doug Martin, draft grades, dre kirkpatrick, Dunta Robinson, dustin keller, Earl Thomas, Eddie Brown, Eric Wood, Felix Jones, Fred Taylor, Glenn Dorsey, Greg Jennings, Harrison Smith, Ian Peters, Indianapolis, J.P. Losman, Jacksonville, Jahvid Best, Jamal Lewis, Jason Babin, Jason Campbell, Jeff Otah, Jerry Butler, Jim Kelly, Joe Horn, Joe Staley, Joe Thomas, John Abraham, John McCargo, Jonathan Stewart, Julian Peterson, K King, Keith Bulluck, Kerry Collins, Kevin Jones, kevin williams, Kevin Zeitler, Knowshon Moreno, Kyle Boller, Larry Smith, Lee Evans, Luis Castillo, manny lawson, Marcus Jones, mark barron, Mark Ingram, mark sanchez, Matt Kalil, Matt Ryan, Matthew Stafford, Michael Hay, Michael Jenkins, Michael Taylor, Mike Bell, Mike Iupati, mike jenkins, Mike McCoy, Minnesota Vikings, Ndamukong Suh, New York Jets, NFL, NFL draft, NFL draft grades, Nick Mangold, Nnamdi Asomugha, Pace, patrick willis, Penn, Pete Adams, Peyton Manning, Phillip Buchanon, Randy White, Ray Agnew, Ray Lewis, Ray Smith, Rex Grossman, Robert Ayers, Robert Jones, Robinson, roy williams, Russell Carter, Russell Okung, Ryan Pickett, Sam Baker, Sam Bradford, Scott Davis, Sharrif Floyd, Shaun Ellis, Shaw, shawne merriman, Sheldon Richardson, St Louis Rams, stars, Steve Hutchinson, Takeo Spikes, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Tavon Austin, Taylor, TBA, Team, Tebucky Jones, terrell suggs, Terry McDaniel, Tim Brown, Tim Green, Tim McGee, Tim Tebow, Tom Brady, Tom Ricketts, Tony Bennett, Tony Hunter, Tony Smith, Trent Richardson, Tyler Bray, Tyler Brayton, Vernon Davis, Vernon Gholston, Vince Wilfork, Xavier Rhodes
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